Bad Words – Just, Still and Really

I searched for “just”, “still” and “really” yesterday. Before I started searching for “just”, I thought it would be quick as I thought I hadn’t used “just” much. Boy, was I wrong! I had used “just” four times in the opening of the story:

“C’mere, are you lost?” said a female voice.

I looked up from the travel guide on my tablet to see the speaker. I smiled sheepishly. “No. Just overwhelmed. I’ve been looking forward to vacationing in Europe for months and now that I’m here, I’m trying to decide what to see now.”
:
Really? I’ve just arrived in Cork and a good-looking woman walks up to me and offers to show me around?
:
During World War One, my great-grandfather James Vaupel had served in the First U. S. Division in France. There, he became best friends with Tip O’Sullivan of Boston and started corresponding with Tip’s sister Rosemary. After the war, he went to Boston and married her. Somehow, the Hessian looks have bred true as I had black hair and dark eyes, just like my father.

“What do you want to see in Cork?”

“I don’t know. I’ve always wanted to see Ireland, but there’s never been a list of sights to see. I want to kiss the Blarney Stone at some point. Mostly, I just want to see Ireland.”

I changed it to:

“C’mere, are you lost?” said a female voice.

I looked up from the travel guide on my tablet and smiled sheepishly at a woman about my age. “No. Just overwhelmed. I’ve been looking forward to vacationing in Europe for months and now that I’m here, I’m trying to decide what to see next.”
:
Really? I’ve been in Cork less that an hour and a good-looking woman walks up to me and offers to show me around?
:
During World War One, my great-grandfather James Vaupel had served in the First U. S. Division in France. There, he became best friends with Tip O’Sullivan of Boston and started corresponding with Tip’s sister, Rosemary. After the war, he went to Boston and married her. Somehow, the Hessian looks have bred true as I had black hair and dark eyes, same as my father.

“What do you want to see in Cork?”

“I don’t know. I’ve always wanted to see Ireland, but I don’t have a list of sights to see. I want to kiss the Blarney Stone at some point. Mostly, I just want to see Ireland.”

With “still”, I mainly took it out of sentences. For example:

I knew it was true, but I still didn’t want to believe it.

became

I knew it was true, but I didn’t want to believe it.

I overuse “really”. Sometimes I took it out. For example:

“I don’t really know what happened between Margie and your grandmam after that.

became:

“I don’t know what happened between Margie and your grandmam after that.

Other times, I replaced “really” with “very”:

A few months after graduation, my friend got me an interview at Apple. It went really well and I was very excited.

became:

A few months after graduation, my friend got me an interview at Apple. It went very well and I was very excited.

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